Archive for the ‘Comedy’ Category

Kingsman

Eggsy (Taron Edgerton) is firmly ensconced as a member of the Kingsman.  He is being chased by Charlie (Edward Holcroft) who is a disgruntled Kingsman trainee, with a robotic arm.  Charlie fails to take down  Eggsy, but his robotic arm hacks Eggsy’s profile and gains valuable information on the Kingsmen.  Charlie works for an organization called the Golden Circle, a secret organization, headed by Poppy Adams (Julianne Moore) which wants to destroy the  Kingsmen.  With the information Poppy gets from Charlie’s robotic arm, she destroys the Kingmen locations throughout the country.  Only Merlin (Mark Strong) and Eggsy survive, what do the two remaining Kingsmen do with no  headquarters and only two agents?  Who is Poppy Adams, and why is she bent on destruction?

The Golden Circle starts out like many action films often do, with a high octane action sequence.  The movie lags when the exposition begins .  It is shamelessly sentimental, on many fronts, including Harry, Merlin, and   Princess Tilde.  The romance between Tilde and Eggy is so forced and unnatural, that it reminds me of how the two lovers first met, which was the worst part of the first movie.  The movie has a thinly veiled feminist justification for Poppy’s villainy, but it’s poorly thought out and realized. The writing anti-drug-in a passive aggressive way.  There are also more of the stereotypical dumb redneck characters in minor roles and major roles, therefore reinforcing a tired movie trope. Add to that that the movie is too long and way too violent, and the result is a truly boring, often redundant sequel to a passable spy flick.

Taron Edgerton is a good young actor, too good to be trapped in a crap soufflé such as this.  He was excellent in the first Kingsmen movie, as well as Eddie the Eagle, and Sing.  Hopefully he can return to more versatile roles, and can quickly erase this mistake from his resume.  Mark Strong is an established veteran actor, but he is someone who can move from role to role with little damage to his career, so hopefully he too can leave this role in the rearview mirror. I guess Colin Firth ran out of Bridget Jones sequels to make.  Julianne Moore doesn’t exude the kind of joy that is required to play a real evil villain, she seems to be going through the motions.  Channing Tatum cannot act, that doesn’t change by adding a badly executed Southern accent.  Jeff Bridges is misused, and Halle Berry is badly underused. A great cast is badly sabotaged by criminally bad writing.

The director does a good job with the action sequences, but the pacing is really slow in the scenes between, which makes a 2 hour, 20 minute movie into what seems like a never-ending dud.  The overreliance on violence is telling, violence is often a filler in a story when the writers can’t think of actual plot, and this movie is no exception. The choice of music is odd, “Take Me Home Country Roads” is an odd choice for music because it refers to West Virginia, and the American part of the movie is in Kentucky.  There is also another John Denver song in this movie, and a John Denver reference, I don’t really understand the reason for these 1970’s references in a movie almost 50 years later.

Kingsmen:  The Golden Circle.  A royal pain.

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the last jedi

General Hux (Domhall Gleeson) launches an attack to wipe out the last of the resistance fleet, but Poe Dameron (Oscar Issac) launches a counterattack that disables a dreadnaught, one of the First Order’s most powerful ships.  The counterattack is a costly one and Poe disobeyed Leia Organa’s (Carrie Fisher) orders not to attack the ship, so Leia demotes Poe.  Leia is injured in a subsequent attack and hands power to Vice Admiral Holdo (Laura Dern) who proceeds to retreat out of range of the First Order’s ship, but Hux’s ship can track the Resistance ship, even in hyperspace, and the resistance ship is running low on fuel, so time is running out for the resistance.

Finn (John Boyega) wants to escape the ship and find Rey, (Daisy Ridley) but he is stopped by Rose Tico (Kelly Marie Tran) Rose’s sister, Paige, (Veronica Ngo) was killed in an initial attack on the dreadnaught, so Rose takes her resistance role seriously.  Rose and Finn figure out how to disable the tracking device, but Maz Kenata (Lupita N’yongo) suggests that they need a master codebreaker, so they travel to the Canto Bright casino to find the codebreaker.

Meanwhile Rey finds Luke (Mark Hamill) on the island of Ahch To, where he is on self-imposed exile. While on the island, Rey is discovering her powers within the force. Luke is disillusioned with being a Jedi, because of his inability to train Kylo, and does not want to give Rey the training she desires.  She is also using her powers to hear the voice of Kylo Ren (Adam  Driver) Kylo is trying to bring Rey to the dark side, Rey sees  the conflict in Kylo’s heart and tries to pull him over to the side of the resistance.  Who wins the mental tug of war?  Kylo or Rey?  Does Luke train Rey? Do Rose and Finn find the codebreaker?

There’s a lot to like about the new Star Wars movie, the Kylo/Rey/Luke storyline is probably the most interesting.  Luke is probably more interesting as a character than he’s ever been, because he’s conflicted. The Rose/Finn casino storyline falls flat, because it’s just silly, it’s as if Casino Royale breaks out during a Star Wars movie. Admiral Holdo is one of the worst characters ever written, she orders people around, doesn’t explain her plan, and gets things mansplained by Poe.  It’s an insult to women everywhere. DJ, the codebreaker is one of the few new characters that works in this film.  But the movie doesn’t end when it should, and the movie limps to an end, and I never thought I’d say that about any Star Wars movie. Despite all the problems with plot and character, the movie works, primarily because of the intensity of the Kylo/Rey/Luke storyline.

The acting varies greatly.  Daisy Ridley is a great actress, there’s something about her eyes and face, that makes the viewer want to watch her.   Adam Driver is superb as Kylo Ren, he brings an intensity to the role that fits the character to a tee.  John Boyega’s role is a little less central to the movie, but he brings the same enthusiasm to his role.  Oscar Issac has a lot of magnetism to the role of Poe, but the script shoots him down several times, and he’s not allowed to show Poe as the daring flyboy he is. I wish Mark Hamill was a better actor, because this version of Luke Skywalker is almost Shakespearean in its complexity.  Unfortunately, Hamill  is not up to the challenge.  Kelly Marie Tran plays Rose like a lovesick teenager, and has no chemistry with John Boyega.  But Laura Dern gives the worst performance in this movie by far, she plays an unlikeable person with no emotion at all, which makes a boring character even more boring.

Riann Johnson is a good director, I liked Looper, I didn’t especially like The Brothers Bloom.  He keeps the pacing going well, I would have cut the casino scene entirely, and worked on another scene to get Rose and Finn together.  People can differ about the casino scene, but I absolutely blame Riann Johnson for not being able to decide on an ending, he actually wrote the perfect ending, but he didn’t end the movie there, he ended the movie much later than he should have.  Also, as director, he didn’t bring the disparate subplots together in time to tell the story in a cohesive manner.

Star Wars:  The Last Jedi:  A flawed tour-de force.

marvelous mrs maisel

Episode 1: Pilot

Midge Maisel (Rachel Brosnahan) has a dream life in the 60’s, she’s married to the love of her life Joel (Michael Zegan) and has two kids.  Joel is a businessman who dreams of being a standup comic, but when he bombs in a comedy club, Midge’s dream life turns into a nightmare.  Joel tells Midge he’s leaving her and having an affair with his secretary, Penny Pann. (Holly Curran)  Drunk and heartbroken, Midge stumbles onto the standup stage, and vents about her cheating husband, and broken marriage.  How does her performance go?

This show starts off slowly with Joel leaving Midge, but the episode gets much funnier after Joel leaves and Midge tries out her standup routine.  The writers seem to emphasize Midge’s Jewishness, I don’t know if they’re trying to be authentic or stereotypical. The acting is good, Rachel Broshnahan stands out, she handles both the comedic aspects and the serious aspects of the part well. Tony Shalhoub, who is usually very funny, overdoes the accent a bit,as Midge’s father.  Alex Borstein from Family Guy is also very funny.

Episode 2: Ya Shivu v Bolshom Dome Na Kholme

Midge is trying to get used to her new life.  Susie Myerson (Alex Borstein) is trying to convince her that she should do stand-up, but Midge is convinced that it is a one time thing. Joel’s father, Moishe (Kevin Pollack) and mother Shirley (Caroline Aaron) are upset about their son’s separation from Midge.  They pressure Midge and Joel to get together for dinner.  Midge and Joel get together, how does the dinner go?

This show is funny, and the laughs come in unexpected places .  Kevin Pollack overdoes Moishe a little but the interplay between Pollack and Tony Shalhoub is funny, the parents on the whole are very funny.  But I hope the writers quit the redundancy of Midge getting angry, and then doing what she does best.  It’s like watching the Incredible Hulk and waiting for David Banner to get angry.  It’s getting to be a tied plot device.  Alex Borstein is funny again, and Rachel Broshnahan is very talented.  Not everyone can show all the sides of a character like she has already done.

Episode3:  Because You Left

Midge goes to jail again, and is bailed out by Lenny Bruce. (Luke Kirby)  Midge also gets a lawyer, because she might need one in the future.  Abe and Moishe hatch a plan, and Joel asks Midge a question,  what is her response?

This episode is not as funny as the first two, and that makes me mad, I sense a dramedy coming and that would ruin a perfectly good show. Rachel Broshnahan does one good stand-up routine,  but she’s like some kind of 50’s rebel, hanging out with musicians, smoking dope, what’s next reciting beat poetry? I hope it doesn’t turn into a cliché.

 

Episode 4:  The Disappointment of The Dionne Quintuplets

Midge moves out of her apartment, and moves in with her parents.  Joel moves out of Archie’s (Joel Johnstone) apartment, and moves into his own place.  When  Midge drops Ethan (Matteo Pacale)  off with Joel, she gets a few surprises.  Susie takes Midge to a few clubs to give her a few tips, but when she comes home late, Midge remembers what living with her parents was like.

I don’t want to say this was filler, because it was funny, but it didn’t have the hallmark of the first three episodes, but it did have something that I didn’t like, name dropping, and when I realize how pathetic 50’s stand-up comedy was, the writers really didn’t need to name drop all that much.  Midge talks about changing her name and that leads me to think that this show is based on someone real, and that’s only one person I can think of.  Good performances by Rachel Broshnahan, Alex Borstein, and Marin Hinkle as Midge’s mother.

Episode 5: Doink

Midge goes to work behind the makeup counter at B.Altman’s.  She also bombs for the first time at the club, and hires a comedy writer named Herb Smith (Wallace Shawn) to sharpen her act. Joel takes Penny out to dinner to meet his parents.  How does that go?

This is an interesting episode, because Midge succeeds at something and then fails at something badly, and her failure droves her to do something impulsive.  Joel is not doing any better trying to impress his parents with Penny Pan.  Wallace Shawn is funny as the well-meaning but not funny comedy writer.

Episode 6:  Miss X At The Gaslight

Midge hones her act at B.Altman parties, and she may have a comedy partner, named Randall. (Nate Cordray)  Susie doesn’t lie any of it, the parties, the partner.  Does she do anything about it?  Abe gets a job offer at Bell Labs, and the family goes out to celebrate and unexpectedly runs into someone at the restaurant.

This was a pretty funny episode, but there was some unnecessary drama, and some unnecessary characters introduced in this episode.

Episode 7:  Put That on Your Plate

Abe brings home a colleague.  Joel is in line for a promotion.  Midge has a “tight ten minute set” and she’s set to open for Sophie Lennon (Jane Lynch) the biggest comedienne in New York.  Sophie gives Midge some advice.  Does she follow the advice?

This is an interesting episode because the women in this episode strike out against the conventional wisdom of the 1950’s.  First Midge’s mom, and then Midge react to external situations not of their own making.

 

Episode 8:Thank You and Good Night

Midge and Joel talk about a divorce, but do their actions suggest something else?  Midge gets blackballed by a powerful   agent.  Midge and Penny fight at B. Altman’s. Joel blows his shot at a business proposal. Midge gets another shot at stand-up, how does she do?

I didn’t like this episode, everything the writers set in motion about women taking charge of their life is suddenly and magically forgotten in this episode, suddenly Joel is calling the shots, and it’s up to Joel whether or not his wife is suitable.  And when everything is pointing to Midge never doing stand-up, suddenly someone appears as a deus ex machina, and her comedy career is back on track.

Season 1 Summary:

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is a very funny show that’s very Jewish.  I don’t know if it’s authentically Jewish, or stereotypically Jewish, but sometimes it seems to cross the line between authentically Jewish and stereotypically Jewish more than once. Are people laughing with Jews, or at Jews?  That’s the fundamental dilemma of this series.

The Gentile characters aren’t that well-written either, one is Penny Pan, who is a homewrecker, a dim-wit, and doesn’t have any friends to speak of.  I’m not sure that Joel even likes her.   The other Gentile character is Astrid, Midge’s sister-in-law, who’s converting to Judaism,  so she aspires to be more Jewish than her Jewish husband.

This is also supposed to be a female empowerment show, a girl power type show that proves even in the fifties, women could make it if they fought hard enough.  It is that show for the most part, but the final episode is really disappointing in that respect.  All the power that Midge built with her comedy, and living alone is somehow lost in that last episode.  The writers cede Midge’s power back to the men in her life in the last episode and that’s disappointing.  Separately, the economic fall that Midge encounters is not as precipitous as it should have been, but Midge just moved in with her parents.

I also didn’t like the name dropping of comedians on the show.  Lenny Bruce is on the show as a character, the writers mention Red Skelton, and Redd Foxx, and Buddy Hackett, and comedians that I generally didn’t think were that funny.  Redd Foxx is funny, Red Skelton, Buddy Hackett, not so much, and the way they use Lenny Bruce to advance certain storylines is a cop out.

All this criticism might lead you to believe that I didn’t like the show, but I actually did like the show quite a bit.  I liked it primarily because of two actors.  Rachel Broshnahan is very talented, she handles the serious and the comedic aspects of the show very well.  She does overplay the Jewishness a little but it’s a good role for her and she plays it well.  Alex Borstein is also very funny, uproariously funny at times, very cynical, very New York street smart, nothing phases her, she wants to bond with Midge, but yet she doesn’t want  to open herself up to ridicule.  It’s a different role than her Family Guy role, and she also handles the role well. Tony Shaloub overplays the Jewish dad role, but modulates a bit later on. Kevin Pollack, who is Jewish, wildly overplays the Jewishness of his character.  I also like Marin Hinkle as Rose, Midge’s mom.  I thought she did a nice job understating her role, and her scenes with the tea-leaf reader are hilarious.

I’m wondering how the show will evolve from here, and where these  characters will go in seasons to come.

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel:  a-Maise-ing.

 

 

girls trip

Ryan Pierce (Regina Hall) is invited to be a keynote speaker at the Essence Festival, the quintessential event celebrating black music and culture.  Ryan is going to the Essence Festival to promote her new book, with her husband Stewart.  (Mike Colter) She decides to invite her friends, because they have drifted apart in the last few years.  Ryan’s friend Sasha (Queen Latifah ) runs an internet gossip site called  Sasha’s Secrets, and she’s despite to find a story to boost clicks to her site,  Lisa Cooper (Jada Pinkett Smith) is a single mother who’s so devoted to her kids, that she doesn’t  even want to leave them alone with her mother to go on this trip with Ryan.  And there’s Dina (Tiffany Haddish) the  wild child of the  group, who will say or do anything, with no apologies. Sasha gets a compromising picture of Stuart with an Instagram model named Simone. (Deborah Ayorinde)   Does Sasha confront Ryan with this picture, possibly wrecking Ryan’s perfect marriage?  Does Sasha post the picture on her site, saving herself from financial ruin? Is the photo even real, or has it been photoshopped?

This movie tries hard to be Bridesmaids, but there are so many problems with the writing that it’s difficult to even begin to explain them.  Start with a few tried-and-true black woman stereotypes.  Dina is the stereotypical l brassy, streetwise black woman that is prevalent in most movies. Then there’s Ryan, with another black female stereotype, the Superwoman, she can do it all, juggle, husband and career, and not break a sweat.  Then there’s some bathroom humor, some Tyler Perry drama, including a bar fight, and for no particular reason, some 1990’s New Jack swing music.  So the uplifting feminist empowerment soliloquy near the end of the film, can’t make the viewer forget all the trivial nonsense that comes before it. On the positive side, there is a really good Madi Gras band in the movie, there should have been more scenes with them in it.

Regina Hall is not really convincing as the “I have it all, you can have it too” persona.  It is not until late in the movie until the writers  humanize her character, that she shows any range at all.  Queen Latifah is competent , but again, there’s little range for the character, Latifah goes between angry and indignant, and that’s not a lot of range.  I didn’t buy Jada Pinkett Smith as a dowdy  hypochondriac, single mother of 2, so the transformation was not that shocking.  Tiffany Haddish is not very funny, she tries really hard,  but she is kind of annoying.  Mike Coulter does a really good job as the roguish, cheating husband, he is a dirtbag, but he has to maintain a public persona, so he is all smiles on the outside.

The direction has nothing noteworthy to speak of, other than a scene at Mardi Gras, and a scene with the marching band, the audience wouldn’t know that it was set in New Orleans at all.  The pacing is slow, the length is excessive for a comedy, and other than Mike Colter, there are no really good performances to speak of.

Girl’s Trip:  Falls flat.

thor ragnarok

Thor (Chris Hemsworth) is locked up in a cage by Sartur (Clancy Brow) a demon who claims to have initiated Ragnarok, a prophesy where Sartur will destroy Asgard.  Thor thinks he’s already stopped the prophesy, but flies to Asgard to talk to his father, Odin.  (Anthony Hopkins)  Instead of Odin, Thor finds Loki (Tom Hiddleston) who seems to have replaced Odin on Asgard.  With a little help from Dr. Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) Thor finds Odin, only to find that he’s dying, and Hela (Cate Banchett) who is Goddess of Death and also Odin’s first born, and also Thor and Loki’s sister, plans to take over the family legacy.When Odin passes away, Hela will have infinite power.  Odin passes away shortly thereafter, and the race is on to get to Asgard.  But Thor and Loki get sidetracked to planet Sakaar, which is ruled by the Grandmaster (Jeff Goldblum) who wants to pit Thor against his champion in a gladiatorial battle.  It turns out Thor already knows the champion of Sakaar, it’s the Hulk, but will beating the Hulk be as easy as Thor thinks and can Thor get back to Asgard before Hela takes it over?

Thor Ragnarok did something that I didn’t think was possible, it made me like a Thor movie.  The previous two Thor movies took themselves so damn seriously, this was a refreshing tongue in cheek take on the Thor story that this trilogy needed in the worst way.  The story is simple, which is crucial to a superhero movie, don’t overcomplicate things.  The backstory with Hela is equally as good, and those two elements alone make this movie worth watching.  There are drawbacks however, the whole Hulk fight scene is unnecessary, in fact Hulk is unnecessary, as is Dr. Strange.  Writers have yet to find a way to integrate Hulk into any avengers movie much less make a decent Hulk movie, in this one the Hulk is little more than comedy relief.  The ending is predictable, and when Hollywood runs out of plot, it pours on the fight scenes and special effects.  Thor Ragnarok is no exception, but Ragnarok is a welcome relief from a character and trilogy that was rapidly losing relevance, in the Marvel universe.

The performances are very good.  Chris Hemsworth is a funny guy, anyone who’s seen him in the Ghostbusters remake, admittedly not that many saw this, but those who did knows he has great comic timing.  Tom Hiddleston is also great as Loki, as he plays up the sibling rivalry again, this time for laughs.  But the best performance in this film undoubtedly belongs to Cate Blanchett, yes she is evil, but she underplays the evil so well that it’s subtle, and she has a reason for being angry, and that makes her performance all the more intriguing.  There are also good performances by Idris Elba Karl Urban, Tessa Thompson and of course Anthony Hopkins. These performances make a well-written movie even better.

The direction is good, the scenes burst with color, yes there’s a lot of CGI, but the film I is not overwhelmed by it.  The pacing is good, the movie moves along at a brisk pace for a movie that’s over 2 hours long, and the director gets a lot of good performances from a very talented cast.

Thor Ragnarok  Rock on!

thelma and louise

Louise (Susan Sarandon) is bored with her life, and with her boyfriend Jimmy, (Michael Madsen)  so she decides to call up her friend, Thelma (Geena Davis) who is sick of her domineering husband, Darryl (Christopher McDonald) and so they decide to drive to Mexico.  Thelma ominously brings her husband’s gun along, in case there’s any trouble.  They go to a bar, and right away, Thelma gets too drunk and too flirtatious with a guy named Harlan. (Timothy Carhart) Harlan takes Thelma to the parking lot of the bar and tries to rape her.  Luckily, Louise gets to the parking lot just in time and shoots Harlan.  They are now fugitives from the law, on the run.

Louise calls Jimmy and asks him to wire her own savings to her; Louise also picks up an attractive, young hitchhiker named J.D., (Brad Pitt) at Thelma’s urging.  When Louise goes to pick up the money, Jimmy is waiting for her.  He asks Louise to marry her.  Does she accept?  Is J.D. is innocent and carefree as he appears?    What of Hal, (Harvey Keitel) the cop who doing the leg work to find Thelma and Louise, does he track them down, or do they escape to Mexico?

The first time I saw this movie, I thought it was an acceptable escapist feminist revenge fantasy.  I see it now and I can’t stand this movie.  The only character who’s got any redeeming characteristics is Louise.  Thelma does one stupid thing after another that gets them deeper and deeper into a hole. So much for being a feminist’s dream movie. J.D. is not what he appears to be, Darryl is the king of the jerks, Jimmy who appears decent has a dark side, and Hal the cop chasing them seems to be the only man who has any empathy at all.  Even the waitresses and superficial and empty headed.  Bar patrons are rapists, and truckers are harassing stalkers.  Khali Khouri who was lauded in the book I just read, wrote a screenplay full of one dimensional, superficial characters in my opinion.  Thelma is supposed to show some growth but her dramatic arc from stupid to wise happens too quickly to be believable.

The acting is adequate.  Susan Sarandon really stands out in this movie, as she does in most movies, and gives a hellacoius performance.  She’s gotta stay one step ahead of the law, and one eye on her friend, and her performance illustrates the frustration she must endure, and also the joy of being free from the things that are shackling her.  I don’t think Geena Davis should have been Oscar nominated, she’s playing the ditzy airhead she always played and wasn’t convincing when her transformation takes place.  Brad Pitt was just asked to be a pretty boy, take his shirt off, and flex his muscles and that’s what he did.  Michael Madsen was very good as Jimmy, he gives the character depth, and a quiet strength. Harvey Keitel with a Southern accent is unintentionally funny, and the accent makes it difficult to take the performance seriously.

The direction is only so-so, while there are some stunning visuals of the American Southwest, but the pacing is inexcusable, it is so painfully slow that it’s painful to watch.  I kept watching hoping the story would move and it didn’t move fast enough, not even remotely fast enough for me. There was so much about what a great director Ridley Scott is in the Over The Cliff book, and he is a good director for science fiction, this story is not his milieu, so he was right in not wanting to direct it.  He shouldn’t have.  He got some good performances, and some not so good ones.

Thelma and Louise.  Don’t Louise sleep over this one.

Movie Review: The Big Sick (2017)

Posted: November 10, 2017 in Comedy, Drama, Romance
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Kumail Nanjani (Himself) is a Pakistani stand-up comedian, he tells his parents, Azmat (Anupam Kher) and Sharmeen (Zenobia Shroff) that he wants to be a lawyer.  Kumail is dating an American girl, named Emily (Zoe Kazan) despite meeting many Pakistani girls to please his parents.  Soon enough, Emily finds out that Kumail is dating all these girls behind her back and she breaks up with him.  After he has moved on, Kumail gets a phone call, and is shocked to hear that Emily has a really serious viral infection.  The doctors may need to do an operation to remove the virus and keep it from spreading and the y may need to put Emily in a medically induced coma to operate.  The doctors can’t find Emily’s parents, Beth  (Holly Hunter) and Terry (Ray Romano) so Kumail has to decide whether to sign the papers or not. What does he do?

First and foremost, this movie was marketed as a light romantic comedy, but the actual movie is light-years away from a light romantic comedy.  This movie is 2 hours of drama, and melodrama with a few jokes sprinkled in.  The main character is an unlikable SOB, who lies to his parents, and girlfriend, and his girlfriend, the other main character,  is in a coma, gee, are we having fun yet? There are jokes in this movie, but the viewer has to slog for hours of really depressing movie to get to those jokes.  Is it worth it?  Not for me it wasn’t.  The ending is not that great either, there are at least two false ending before getting to the real ending, which makes the real ending all the more annoying.  The standup comedy scenes funny, are and the comedians are good.  There are some good performances here, but don’t  watch this film  waiting for a laugh out loud comedy, because it’s not.

Kumail Manjani is really not a likable guy and since he’s playing himself in a true story from his life, he must not be a likable person in real life.  His humor is also an acquired taste, something like a deadpan understated humor.  Zoe Kazan has a whiny voice that makes her character hard to stomach, when she’s not comatose. The people who make this movie watching are Emily’s parents. Ray Romano, who also has a whiny voice is not annoying in this movie, he’s actually very sweet and understanding, and funny in a way that this movie needed.  Holly Hunter plays Beth as a feisty Southern wife and mother who’ll fight anyone to save her daughter, but she does it while making the character endearing, which is not an easy thing to do.  The Pakistani characters were one-dimensional, and somewhat stereotypical, and that made Anupam Kher and Zenobia Shroff’s jobs very difficult.  I’ve seen Anupam Kher in Silver Linings Playbook Bend It Like Beckham and a few Hindi language film, and he usually plays the father in these movies, so this is not s stretch for him.  But the father is such a tradition-bound character that there’s not much for Kher to do as an actor. The mother is similarly boxed in.

The direction is not great, the pacing is slow, the story is two hours long, which is death for a comedy, and the great performances come not from the leads, but from the parents of the daughter, who are also Hollywood veterans.  The director is a television show director for the most part.  This looks like his first feature film. Judd Apatow  produced this, it didn’t seem like he had a big budget or needed one for that matter.

The Big Sick Not infectiously Funny.