Posts Tagged ‘kate beckinsale’

love and friendship

The recently widowed Lady Susan Vernon (Kate Beckensale) has gone to live with her brother-in-law, Charles Vernon (Justin Edwards) and his wife Catherine, (Emma Greenwell) in their palatial home Churchill.  Susan has her eye on the much younger Reginald De Courcy (Xavier Samuel) who is also Catherine’s brother.  The age difference is shocking to Reginald’s father, Reginald Sr. (James Fleet) who is determined to stop the courtship. Quite suddenly, Susan’s daughter, Fredrica (Morfydd Clark) shows up at Churchill , and she is panicked at the thought of marrying Sir James Martin (Tom Bennet) a wealthy dolt, who wants very much to marry Fredrica, but Fredrica has fallen for young Reginald at first sight.  Nothing seems to be standing in the of Susan and young Reginald getting married, but then Lucy Manwaring  (Jenn Murray) confronts Reginald with some shocking news about Susan.  What is this news?  Does it make Reginald rethink his upcoming nuptials?  Who does Susan marry?  Who does Fredrica marry?

This is a period piece, set in 1790 based on a Jane Austen novella.  It’s a comedy of manners filled with polite titters and not large guffaws.  Most of the laughs come from Susan manipulating her daughter, her best friend and the men in her life to get her desired result. The James Martin character provides more laughs with his absurdist, buffoonish character.  If one digs deeper, there is a bit of social commentary about why women married in the late 18th century, but it’s subtle like the rest of this movie.  I’ve seen better Jane Austen adaptations, Emma and Sense and Sensibility, but this is pretty good.

The acting is good.  Beckensale seems very comfortable with the Jane Austen turn of phrase, and she probably feels good being able to act in a role that doesn’t involve vampires or werewolves.  This is the kind of role she should be playing. Tom Bennett is extremely funny as the clueless suitor of Morfydd Clark, I wish he had a bigger role.  The rest of the actors play their character roles well, but no one really stands out, other than Beckinsale and Bennett.

There’s not much that stands out about the direction, the pacing is very slow, dull Victorian England looks appropriately dull, there’s nothing visual to spice thing up.  The director does something rather amateurish, in my opinion.  He puts the character’s names in the opening scenes, so instead of explaining who they are through exposition, the viewer reads who they are, which is an immature way to tell a story.

Love and Friendship:  Beckinsale is no plain Jane, in this Austen adaptation.

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