Posts Tagged ‘louis ck’

th secret life of pets

Max (Louis CK) is a pampered pet living in New York City.  His owner, Katie (Ellie Kemper) raised him from a pup, and Max misses Katie terribly when she goes to work, but she hangs out with the neighborhood pets when she’s gone, he hangs around with other pets, a cat with a voracious appetite, named Chloe, (Lake Bell) a pug, Mel, (Bobby Moynihan) a dachshund ,Buddy (Hannibal Burress)  and a Pomeranian named Gidget  (Jenny Slate) with a secret crush on Max.  Max’s cushy life ends abruptly when  Kate brings home Duke (Eric Stonestreet) from the pound.

Max and Duke don’t like each other, and Duke drags Max way out of his neighborhood where they are attacked by cats, who forcibly remove their collars.  Max and Duke are then dragged into a van by animal control and are on their way to the pound.  Max and Duke are “rescued” by Flushed Pets a militant group of former pets who want to lead a revolution against their human masters.  They are led by a deranged bunny named Snowball, (Kevin Hart) and have their headquarters in the New York City sewer system.  Snowball holds Max and Duke hostage after they refuse to go along with Snowball’s revolution.  Can Gidget and Max’s other friends save him from Snowball?

This movie misses the mark almost completely, there are a few funny moments, but not nearly enough to sustain a whole movie.  I’ve seen a lot of animated films, and The Secret Life of Pets doesn’t even come close to Pixar films in terms of plot and theme. There are animated movies for kids and animated movies for adults and this one is definitely aimed towards kids.  Here’s the ironic part, the Flushed Pets are definitely not for kids, they espouse kidnapping and violence, so the theme of two dogs from different backgrounds trying  to get along is completely overshadowed by this strange subplot.  There are good characters, Chloe, the cat, Gidget the Pomeranian, but they are woefully underdeveloped.  The writers ran out of material, about 15 minutes before the ending and so they just repeat a plot point from earlier in the movie.

The voice acting is not great.  Louis CK is way too mellow as Max, I expected some sharper, funnier lines from him, the director should have let him ad lib a little. Eric Stonestreet at least tries to inject some personality into Duke.  Kevin Hart goes far overboard on Snowball, someone needs to give Snowball some kitty Xanex.  All kidding aside, again it’s the director’s job to reign in such prodigious overacting, and he did not.  Jenny Slate has a likeable quality to her voice, they should have developed her character more fully, but there were so many characters that the writers didn’t or couldn’t focus on a few.  Lake Bell does a good job also playing a cat who all the dogs are slightly wary of. She should have had more lines.

The direction is not that great.  The directors just seemed to let the actors do whatever they felt like doing, and sometimes that works, and sometimes it doesn’t.  One of the directors directed Despicable Me which I really liked, but I didn’t like this movie at all.   The animation was not great other than a few scenes of the New York City skyline.

The Secret Life of Pets:  For the dogs.

20170114_LCK _MG_2740.CR2

Louis CK talks about suicide, abortion, religion and his kids.

Talking about abortion and suicide is not the way most comedians would open a comedy show, but Louis CK opens his comedy special talking about precisely those topics.  And guess what, he’s funny talking about suicide and abortion, at least I thought he was funny.  Some people might be incredibly offended,  and that’s your choice, turn it off ten minutes in.  There is material he did that did not work for me, but he is always taking risks with his material, and I respect that.  Most of the material did make me laugh, so the fact that it unique and funny, that makes Louis CK a very talented comedian. It’s also important to note that this routine was filmed in Washington DC, I don’t know that these jokes would go over so well in Texas or Kansas. It’s important to know your audience, and Louis knows his audience.

Now that doesn’t mean this special is for everyone, there is bad language,  and topics discussed that aren’t for everyone.  In fact, he does voices, that might offend some people, but if the viewer has watched to the point where he starts to do the voices, the viewer thinks CK is funny anyway.  And if the viewer doesn’t like the voices, he or she might find something funny later.

There is nothing going on from a director’s point of view, just Louis CK talking to the audience.  I do not know if any of the material was edited, but it didn’t look like it. He just seems to be talking to the audience.

Louis CK:  See it,’K?