thor ragnarok

Thor (Chris Hemsworth) is locked up in a cage by Sartur (Clancy Brow) a demon who claims to have initiated Ragnarok, a prophesy where Sartur will destroy Asgard.  Thor thinks he’s already stopped the prophesy, but flies to Asgard to talk to his father, Odin.  (Anthony Hopkins)  Instead of Odin, Thor finds Loki (Tom Hiddleston) who seems to have replaced Odin on Asgard.  With a little help from Dr. Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) Thor finds Odin, only to find that he’s dying, and Hela (Cate Banchett) who is Goddess of Death and also Odin’s first born, and also Thor and Loki’s sister, plans to take over the family legacy.When Odin passes away, Hela will have infinite power.  Odin passes away shortly thereafter, and the race is on to get to Asgard.  But Thor and Loki get sidetracked to planet Sakaar, which is ruled by the Grandmaster (Jeff Goldblum) who wants to pit Thor against his champion in a gladiatorial battle.  It turns out Thor already knows the champion of Sakaar, it’s the Hulk, but will beating the Hulk be as easy as Thor thinks and can Thor get back to Asgard before Hela takes it over?

Thor Ragnarok did something that I didn’t think was possible, it made me like a Thor movie.  The previous two Thor movies took themselves so damn seriously, this was a refreshing tongue in cheek take on the Thor story that this trilogy needed in the worst way.  The story is simple, which is crucial to a superhero movie, don’t overcomplicate things.  The backstory with Hela is equally as good, and those two elements alone make this movie worth watching.  There are drawbacks however, the whole Hulk fight scene is unnecessary, in fact Hulk is unnecessary, as is Dr. Strange.  Writers have yet to find a way to integrate Hulk into any avengers movie much less make a decent Hulk movie, in this one the Hulk is little more than comedy relief.  The ending is predictable, and when Hollywood runs out of plot, it pours on the fight scenes and special effects.  Thor Ragnarok is no exception, but Ragnarok is a welcome relief from a character and trilogy that was rapidly losing relevance, in the Marvel universe.

The performances are very good.  Chris Hemsworth is a funny guy, anyone who’s seen him in the Ghostbusters remake, admittedly not that many saw this, but those who did knows he has great comic timing.  Tom Hiddleston is also great as Loki, as he plays up the sibling rivalry again, this time for laughs.  But the best performance in this film undoubtedly belongs to Cate Blanchett, yes she is evil, but she underplays the evil so well that it’s subtle, and she has a reason for being angry, and that makes her performance all the more intriguing.  There are also good performances by Idris Elba Karl Urban, Tessa Thompson and of course Anthony Hopkins. These performances make a well-written movie even better.

The direction is good, the scenes burst with color, yes there’s a lot of CGI, but the film I is not overwhelmed by it.  The pacing is good, the movie moves along at a brisk pace for a movie that’s over 2 hours long, and the director gets a lot of good performances from a very talented cast.

Thor Ragnarok  Rock on!

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thelma and louise

Louise (Susan Sarandon) is bored with her life, and with her boyfriend Jimmy, (Michael Madsen)  so she decides to call up her friend, Thelma (Geena Davis) who is sick of her domineering husband, Darryl (Christopher McDonald) and so they decide to drive to Mexico.  Thelma ominously brings her husband’s gun along, in case there’s any trouble.  They go to a bar, and right away, Thelma gets too drunk and too flirtatious with a guy named Harlan. (Timothy Carhart) Harlan takes Thelma to the parking lot of the bar and tries to rape her.  Luckily, Louise gets to the parking lot just in time and shoots Harlan.  They are now fugitives from the law, on the run.

Louise calls Jimmy and asks him to wire her own savings to her; Louise also picks up an attractive, young hitchhiker named J.D., (Brad Pitt) at Thelma’s urging.  When Louise goes to pick up the money, Jimmy is waiting for her.  He asks Louise to marry her.  Does she accept?  Is J.D. is innocent and carefree as he appears?    What of Hal, (Harvey Keitel) the cop who doing the leg work to find Thelma and Louise, does he track them down, or do they escape to Mexico?

The first time I saw this movie, I thought it was an acceptable escapist feminist revenge fantasy.  I see it now and I can’t stand this movie.  The only character who’s got any redeeming characteristics is Louise.  Thelma does one stupid thing after another that gets them deeper and deeper into a hole. So much for being a feminist’s dream movie. J.D. is not what he appears to be, Darryl is the king of the jerks, Jimmy who appears decent has a dark side, and Hal the cop chasing them seems to be the only man who has any empathy at all.  Even the waitresses and superficial and empty headed.  Bar patrons are rapists, and truckers are harassing stalkers.  Khali Khouri who was lauded in the book I just read, wrote a screenplay full of one dimensional, superficial characters in my opinion.  Thelma is supposed to show some growth but her dramatic arc from stupid to wise happens too quickly to be believable.

The acting is adequate.  Susan Sarandon really stands out in this movie, as she does in most movies, and gives a hellacoius performance.  She’s gotta stay one step ahead of the law, and one eye on her friend, and her performance illustrates the frustration she must endure, and also the joy of being free from the things that are shackling her.  I don’t think Geena Davis should have been Oscar nominated, she’s playing the ditzy airhead she always played and wasn’t convincing when her transformation takes place.  Brad Pitt was just asked to be a pretty boy, take his shirt off, and flex his muscles and that’s what he did.  Michael Madsen was very good as Jimmy, he gives the character depth, and a quiet strength. Harvey Keitel with a Southern accent is unintentionally funny, and the accent makes it difficult to take the performance seriously.

The direction is only so-so, while there are some stunning visuals of the American Southwest, but the pacing is inexcusable, it is so painfully slow that it’s painful to watch.  I kept watching hoping the story would move and it didn’t move fast enough, not even remotely fast enough for me. There was so much about what a great director Ridley Scott is in the Over The Cliff book, and he is a good director for science fiction, this story is not his milieu, so he was right in not wanting to direct it.  He shouldn’t have.  He got some good performances, and some not so good ones.

Thelma and Louise.  Don’t Louise sleep over this one.

a ghost story

A musician named C, (Casey Affleck) and his wife M, (Rooney Mara) are having trouble in their married life.  C suddenly dies in a car accident, leaving M by herself.  C returns as a ghost and continues to wander around the house trying to sooth M in her time of grief.  He seem to be scratching at a wall inside the house, but what is the spirit of C doing?  Is he trying to send a message to M?  Or is there something else hidden under the paint in that wall?

This movie tries very hard to be a traditional ghost story where a spirit wanders around looking for eternal rest, but even that simple storyline is muddled by flashbacks and flash forwards, and needless subplots.  Making matters worse this movie is devoid of dialogue for large swaths of the story.  Anything is better than the awkward silences that engulf this movie, including bad narration.  But nothing can save this movie, because after nearly 90 minutes of viewing.  I simply have no idea what the writer is trying to say.  I have watched a lot of arthouse films from many countries in many different languages, but it’s very difficult to comprehend why this movie was ever made, it is simply that bad.  The critics seem to love it for reasons that escape me, but the film puzzles me, so why shouldn’t the reaction to this film

Casey Affleck seems to like roles where he doesn’t have to say much.  After making Manchester By The Sea, he plays another character off very few words.  I’ve forgotten if Casey Affleck can act at all.  This is not a good test of his acting abilities.  Rooney Mara is similarly wordless, I don’t know how to measure her performance either because the script is so bereft of emotion.  And this is essentially a two person movie, so there’s no one else to take the burden of this barren script off their shoulders.

Director David Lowery is also the writer, and matches the lack of dialogue with a glacially slow place, an hour and a half feels like three hours, and that makes this movie a difficult watch, at best,  I can’t tell if the actors give good performances, because they have precious little to say.

A Ghost Story.  Didn’t raise my spirits.

 

Stranger Things Season 2:

Posted: November 10, 2017 in horror, TV
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strangerthings 2

Chapter 1:  Madmax

Will Byers (Noah Schnapp) is still having visions of the Upside Down, and he’s seeing a doctor, Dr. Owens (Raul Reiser) to talk about it. Sheriff Hopper (David Harbour) is still worried about Joyce Byers (Winona Ryder) but Joyce is dating Bob. (Sean Astin)   Will’s brother Jonathan (Charlie Heaton) is still carrying a torch for Nancy Wheeler (Natalia Dyer) but she’s still dating Steve Harrrigan, (Joe Keely) and mourning Barb. Dustin Galen Materazzo) and Lucas (Caleb McLaughlin) are smitten over the new girl in school, Max, (Sadie Sink  Mike Wheeler (Finn Wolfhard) has been searching for Eleven Millie Bobbie Brown) for a year with his walkie talkie, but can’t find her.  Where is she?

Most if not all of the characters are back from Season 1, and I find the show strangely addictive because I want to watch episode two, I didn’t think that the show or the characters were that memorable, but I guess they were.  I also want to see how the new characters fit in to the show as a whole. One of the new storylines widens the scope of the story to beyond Hawkins, Indiana.

Chapter 2: Trick Or Treat You Freak

It’s Halloween 1984, and Mike, Will, Dustin and Lucas dress up as the Ghostbusters, and no one else is dressed up.  Dustin and Lucas ask Max to go trick or treating with them, and she doesn’t want to, until Billy (Dacre Montgomery) almost run the boys over with his Camaro.  Jonathan leaves Will with his friends to go to a teen party where Nancy and Steve are, and things do not go as planned for Nancy or Steve.  Mike is mad that Max is along, and takes Will home after Will has another vision, what is it a vison of?  Eleven is trying to find Mike psychically, but not having any luck. Dustin finds something in his trashcan, what is it?

This is another character driven episode, and the characters are getting more interesting.  There’s also some genuine scares in this episode, as the Duffer brothers turn up the suspense about what’s creeping in the darkness in Indiana.

Chapter 3:  The Pollywog:

Dustin gets a new pet.  Will gets a ride to school from Bob and some advice on how to face his fears. Eleven ventures out to try to meet Mike. Sheriff Hooper tries to get Dr. Owens that something strange isn’t coming from the lab, and destroying local pumpkin crops.  Joyce gets a clue about what’s bothering Will after watching a videotape of Halloween.  Nancy and Jonathan plan to meet with Barb’s mother.

Didn’t Justin see Gremlins?  Don’t feed the pets. The storylines are  getting more and more interesting and the relationships between Max, the boys and Eleven is also getting interesting. The suspense surrounding what Will sees is actually more scary than what he actually sees.  And each show seems to have a cliffhanger, which makes the viewer want to see the next episode.

 

Chapter 4: Will The Wise

Will undergoes physical and emotional changes after his latest vision of the Upside Down. Mike thnks Will has “true vision” but does he, and does that help the party figure out what’s going on in the Upside Down? Dustin’s new pet shows its true colors.  Nancy and Jonathan embark on a plan that goes beyond telling Barb’s mom the truth about Barb’s death.  Mike bans Max from their party.  Eleven throws a tantrum.  Sheriff Hopper has a revelation.

Will’s transformation is more interesting than what he’s actually seen in the Upside Down.  There’s still some mystery about what Jonathan and Nancy are doing, There’s a lot of mystery about Max and Billy.  Who are they really?  I have my theory, let’s see if it pans out.  There is also a mystery about what’s killing the pumpkins.  So there’s lots of intriguing things going on, but I don’t like what the writers have done to Eleven, she’s a petulant child who cries a lot.  The writers have taken the worst stereotypes for girls and combined them all into one girl.  They’ve also made Dustin extremely dumb, and he’s the one who knows the most about alternate dimensions, so it doesn’t make sense that he would be the gullible one.

Chapter 5: Dig Dug

Hopper gets in way over his head.  Nancy and Jonathan meet someone outside Hawkins to help them with their plan.  Eleven tries to meet someone from her past.  Joyce tries to find Hopper with help from Will and Mike.  Lucas tries to make up with Max.  Dustin forms an unlikely partnership with Steve.

I like that Joyce is actually getting the kids involved in looking for Hopper.  I don’t like the Eleven storyline at all, more crying and emotional upheaval.  I don’t think the Jonathan/Nancy storyline is going anywhere, It’s just an episode extender.  I don’t know where the Max/Lucas story is going, but I also have a theory on that, related to my other Max and Billy theory.

Chapter 6:  The Spy

Will is taken to the hospital.  He says his skin is burning, but there are no burn marks on his body.  Is it his psychic connection that’s making him feel things no one else is feeling? Steve and Dustin go hunting for Dustin’s pet. Jonathan and Nancy get sidetracked on their road trip.  Max and Lucas join Steve and Dustin in their search.

In an episode, Stranger Things has turned into a conventional horror flick.  A little teen and pre-teen romance to divert people’s attention, but it’s basically a garden variety horror flick.   The writers inexplicably have taken the best elements from last year, Eleven, and the government conspiracy, and put them on the shelf.

Chapter 7: The Lost Sister

Visions take Eleven to Chicago in search of someone else from Hawkins Lab.

Having done the horror genre, the writers try the revenge fantasy genre, and it lands with a thud. Even the writers realize this is a waste of time.  This is a total filler episode.  It tries to squeeze in a twist, but no one can tell if the twist is real or not. This is disappointing.  A show that had so much promise two episodes ago, is now circling the drain.  The mystery character was better as a mystery.  The bulk of the acting is done by Millie Bobbie Brown and another young actress.  Bad idea.

Chapter 8:  The Mind Flayer

Everyone is trapped in Hawkins Lab with the mire and more creatures that look like Dustin’s pet.  Meanwhile, Will is suffering as his visions manifest inside him.

I think the problem with these final episodes is that the writers revealed things too quickly, and now they are employing a deus ex machina ending because everyone else is helpless to stop the situation from spiraling out of control. This is pretty unimaginative writing.

Chapter 9:  The Gate

Eleven has to close the portal to the Upside Down before what is lurking there comes to the surface, there is something that has to happen first.  Will she be able to close the portal in time?

The ending is predictable, and again relies on Eleven as the deus ex machina to get the rest of Hawkins Indiana out of deep doo doo.

The show on the whole was disappointing on the whole, partly because it was so engaging and good for the first half of season 2 and then episode 6 happened and the bottom fell out.  It reminded me of so many movies and shows that it stopped being original.  There are parts that feel like Gremlins , Pacific Rim, Poltergiest, Jurassic Park, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Star Trek The Next Generation, The Host, and many others.  The writers changed the most important elements of the show, Eleven and the government conspiracy, change those two things and the show is just like any other show.

The teen characters were more engaging this time around.  I liked Jonathan and Nancy, the writers even made Steve more sympathetic, and give him a new rival, Billy.  Billy seems to have a giant chip on his shoulder and I’m not really sure why.  I like Maxine, but I don’t like what the writers did to Eleven/Jane, I liked season 1 Eleven much more.  The writers seemed to make Dustin a lot dumber than season 1, and Mike was given a smaller role, and Will was given a bigger role this season, that was a mistake.

I also think the writers were too quick to put these characters in romantic situations. Mike was pining for Eleven in many episodes, Dustin and Lucas became romantic rivals, and there’s already a love triangle between Steve, Nancy and Jonathan.  These budding romances are fillers for when the writers don’t have enough horror content.

Winona Rider and David Harbour were excellent.  Ryder played worried mom Joyce Byers to a tee, but she was also figuring things out, and that was a new dimension.  David Harbor plays Chief Hopper very well, he’s trying to balance the strange things going on, with an added responsibility.  Sean Astin was a fun character a nerdy guy who the kids really don’t like, who evolves later on. Paul Reiser was miscast, I don’t know if he was a hero, a villain, or comedy relief, he certainly didn’t have the intensity of Matthew Modine. Millie Bobby Brown was not as good this year as last,  that had a lot to do with the writing of her character. Dacre Montgomery plays Billy as a little bit of a psycho, and I really don’t  know why he was written the way he was. I like Sadie Sink, she had a good mix of comedy and drama in her role, and she played both well.

The plot was intriguing until episode six, in my opinion, and then it just became too derivative of other movies and shows and became a conventional horror show with monsters.  And of course there is going to be a season three, because portals to other dimensions have a habit of opening, just when everyone thinks everything is fine.  Besides Stranger Things is making a lot of money for Netflix.

Did I like Season 2 as much as Season One, in a word, no.  I thought Season two limped to the finish with a predictable and conventional ending.  Keeping Eleven apart from the party really hurt the second season. Dr. Owens is much less menacing than Dr. Bremmer and that hurts the second season as well.  Justice for Barb the hot new internet hashtag, was tacked on like an afterthought. Mad Max was supposed to be this take no prisoners girl from California, but the character turned out to be much less than meets the eye.  Let’s hope for better in season 3.

Stranger Things 2: After a good start, it goes to the demi-dogs.

Movie Review: The Big Sick (2017)

Posted: November 10, 2017 in Comedy, Drama, Romance
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Kumail Nanjani (Himself) is a Pakistani stand-up comedian, he tells his parents, Azmat (Anupam Kher) and Sharmeen (Zenobia Shroff) that he wants to be a lawyer.  Kumail is dating an American girl, named Emily (Zoe Kazan) despite meeting many Pakistani girls to please his parents.  Soon enough, Emily finds out that Kumail is dating all these girls behind her back and she breaks up with him.  After he has moved on, Kumail gets a phone call, and is shocked to hear that Emily has a really serious viral infection.  The doctors may need to do an operation to remove the virus and keep it from spreading and the y may need to put Emily in a medically induced coma to operate.  The doctors can’t find Emily’s parents, Beth  (Holly Hunter) and Terry (Ray Romano) so Kumail has to decide whether to sign the papers or not. What does he do?

First and foremost, this movie was marketed as a light romantic comedy, but the actual movie is light-years away from a light romantic comedy.  This movie is 2 hours of drama, and melodrama with a few jokes sprinkled in.  The main character is an unlikable SOB, who lies to his parents, and girlfriend, and his girlfriend, the other main character,  is in a coma, gee, are we having fun yet? There are jokes in this movie, but the viewer has to slog for hours of really depressing movie to get to those jokes.  Is it worth it?  Not for me it wasn’t.  The ending is not that great either, there are at least two false ending before getting to the real ending, which makes the real ending all the more annoying.  The standup comedy scenes funny, are and the comedians are good.  There are some good performances here, but don’t  watch this film  waiting for a laugh out loud comedy, because it’s not.

Kumail Manjani is really not a likable guy and since he’s playing himself in a true story from his life, he must not be a likable person in real life.  His humor is also an acquired taste, something like a deadpan understated humor.  Zoe Kazan has a whiny voice that makes her character hard to stomach, when she’s not comatose. The people who make this movie watching are Emily’s parents. Ray Romano, who also has a whiny voice is not annoying in this movie, he’s actually very sweet and understanding, and funny in a way that this movie needed.  Holly Hunter plays Beth as a feisty Southern wife and mother who’ll fight anyone to save her daughter, but she does it while making the character endearing, which is not an easy thing to do.  The Pakistani characters were one-dimensional, and somewhat stereotypical, and that made Anupam Kher and Zenobia Shroff’s jobs very difficult.  I’ve seen Anupam Kher in Silver Linings Playbook Bend It Like Beckham and a few Hindi language film, and he usually plays the father in these movies, so this is not s stretch for him.  But the father is such a tradition-bound character that there’s not much for Kher to do as an actor. The mother is similarly boxed in.

The direction is not great, the pacing is slow, the story is two hours long, which is death for a comedy, and the great performances come not from the leads, but from the parents of the daughter, who are also Hollywood veterans.  The director is a television show director for the most part.  This looks like his first feature film. Judd Apatow  produced this, it didn’t seem like he had a big budget or needed one for that matter.

The Big Sick Not infectiously Funny.

TV Review: Black Mirror Season 1

Posted: November 10, 2017 in Drama, TV
Tags: ,

black mirror

Episode 1:  The National Anthem

British Prime Minister Michael Callow (Rory Kinnear) is faced with the kidnapping of Princess Susannah, (Lydia Wilson) the video cannot be traced, neither can the man or group responsible for the kidnapping.  The kidnapper has an audacious demand?  Does the Prime Minister comply?

The kidnapper’s demand seems like a joke, so it’s hard to take the premise seriously, so right away this episode gets off on the wrong foot, and it never regains its footing.  Doesn’t the royal family have the guards at Buckingham Palace?  What were they doing, sleeping?  This episode does say something about the British, it tells anyone who watches it how much the British love the Royal Family.  It also makes some trite, overbaked comments about the power of “social media” that no one needs to hear again. The ending was almost an afterthought, so this episode doesn’t rate very highly with me.  Not a good way to start a Twilight Zone type series.

Episode 2: 15 Million Merits

Bing (Daniel Kaluuya) lives in a society where everyone has to pedal an exercycle to power the electrical needs of society at large.  Every time Bing peddles, he earns credits, called merits, which he can use to buy things, like tchotchkes for his avatar, or pornographic videos.  The big prize is a ticket to Hot Shot, a talent show, broadcast nationwide.  That ticket costs a cool 15 million merits.  One day, while in the bathroom he hears a girl named Abi (Jessica Brown Findlay) singing a song.  Bing thinks Abi has a beautiful voice, and buys her a ticket to Hot Shots.

What happens to Abi at Hot Shots?  How does Bing react?

Bicycles and reality show television.  The future is bleak indeed.  I’m the first to slam show like American Idol, it has pretty much decimated rock music, but once again this show takes the things that annoy people about today’s culture, endless talents shows, avatars, and anonymous rating pf people, and makes it extreme, to the point that nothing rings true, and the situation becomes an absurdist one.  The romance between Bing and Abi seems rushed and insincere.  Daniel Kaluuya, who was great in Get Out, seems uninteresting and uninterested in this role.  Kaluuya is great in Get Out, not so much here.

Episode 3:  The Entire History of You

Liam (Toby Kebbell) lives in a society where all memories can be recalled through a microchip implanted near the ear.  Liam flies in to join a party thrown by his wife Fi. (Jodie Whittaker)  Fi is paying particular attention to an ex-flame named Jonas, (Tom Cullen) and it bothers Liam, so he asks her how long she was involved with him, and she says that it was only a week.  But Liam persists and finds out that they were involved for more than 6 months.

Incensed, he goes to see Jonas and asks him to erase all his memories of Fi, or he will remove Jonas’ microchip forcefully.  Faced with the threat of physical harm, Jonas complies.  Then Liam confronts Fi about the paternity of their son.  How does Fi respond?  What is the truth?

This is probably the best of the three episodes in season one, because it deals with a real issue in a futuristic context.  The issue of infidelity has been a problem, and will be a problem in the future.  But would people really want to prove infidelity by digging into your spouse’s memories?  That’s the more interesting question.  The story is one sided, however, because the viewer never sees Liam’s past relationships, so there is a bit of a double standard there.  Also the story reminds me a bit of Eternal Sunshine of The Spotless Mind. In that movie Jim Carrey wanted to forget a bad relationship, in this episode, Toby Kebbell wants to use memories to find the truth about his marriage.  The story drags a bit, but good acting from Kebbell and Cullen keep things interesting.

Overall, season one was not very good, the storylines were weak, the first story was especially difficult to take seriously.  The second was equally hard to believe, for different reasons.  Both stories tried to talk about the evils of social networking, to little avail.  Only the third episode resonates, because it deals with  a serious issue that any married couple fears.

Over The Cliff

Callie Khouri, from Paducah Kentucky, started her work life waiting tables, by the time she had risen to becoming a music video director in Hollywood, she had been through enough harassment by men and broken relationships to get the initial thoughts about writing her own movie.  She loved movies, but she didn’t like the roles that were written for most women in the 80’s, so she decided to write a movie of her own.  She write it long hand on legal pads, it was a story featuring not one but two female heroines, Thelma and Louise, both on the run from bad relationships of their own and towards a whole lot of adventure.

By the time the script was ready, a fellow video director, Amanda Temple had shopped the script all over Hollywood, and gotten a pretty cool reception.  The sticking point with everyone seemed to be the ending of the movie, which seemed over the top.  Amanda then sought out the advice of a friend, Mimi Polk, who worked for director Ridley Scott, and his production company.  Scott had directed such movies as Alien and Blade Runner.  Mimi Polk was blown away by the script and implored Ridley Scott to read it.  Ridley Scott was similarly impressed, but he didn’t want to direct it, he wanted to produce it, after interviewing many directors, including Phillip Noice, who directed Dead Calm, and considering female directors like Amy Heckerling and Susan Seidelman, Ridley thought maybe his brother Tony would be best to direct it.  Callie wasn’t exactly crazy about Tony’s treatment of Beverly hills Cop II, but her opinion mattered little at this stage of the production. But Tony wasn’t crazy about the script, so the question of who would direct was still an open question.

By this time, buzz about this film was circling Hollywood, right away A-list actresses like Jodie Foster and Michelle Pfeiffer expressed immediate interest, so did Meryl Streep and Goldie Hawn.  Pfeiffer eventually starred in Love Field, Foster starred in Silence of the Lambs. But Any number of actresses were interested Cybil Sheppard, Daryl Hannah, Meg Ryan, Rebecca DeMornay, and many others, who would get those pivotal roles that would make the movie a memorable one and possibly change the trajectory of their careers.

As important as who would produce direct, and star in the movie was which studio would back it.  As with the screenplay, the major studios balked at getting involved in making this movie.  Then a small studio named  Pathe, headed by former actor Alan Ladd, expressed great interest in making the movie. As soon as the other studios saw Pathe’s interest, they also became interested.  The question was could a small studio finance the demands of the actors, director, and screenwriter and promote the film properly?  Conversely, would a big studio try to change the film to make it more commercially viable?

This book was a natural read for me, this is a movie blog, so what better book to read than a behind the scenes book about the making of a truly revolutionary film.  Knowing who the film stars, and who directed it, it’s fun to see all the stars and directors mentioned in connection with the film.  It’s also fun to note the emergence of Brad Pitt as a major star, he had a small scene, as a love interest for the Thelma character, another major star auditioned for the role and lost out on it.  It’s interesting to know how intimately involved the director was in every facet of the movie, the visuals the story, almost every aspect of what the viewer hears and sees.  And most of all the story of Callie Khouri  is an amazing one.  She came up with a great idea for a screenplay wrote it, and despite being from Paducah Kentucky, and having no Hollywood connections, she had her story made into a Hollywood film.

But this movie was a struggle, the director would fight with the actors over certain scenes, there was tension over the love scenes over a largely male crew shooting females in such delicate scenes.  There was even one scene where the director asked one of the stars to go topless, she demurred and the other female star stepped in and flatly said no for the both of them.

Underlying all the tension was an undertone of harassment.  Many women on the cast and crew mention stories of sexual harassment on other movie productions.  But here’s where the author backs down a little, she never mentions any of the male crew members names, and other than one notable star, who is dead, Charlton Heston, no one is mentioned as anything untoward, for fear of a libel suit, I’m sure. Ironically, Harvey Weinstein is mentioned in passing, once as rejecting the script for Thelma and Louise, and once identified as “showman producer” Harvey Weinstein.  I don’t think women ever wanted to see what he was showing.  The point of this is to illustrate that harassment and the casting couch is not a new story, and it continues.

The book ends on a high note, after some depressing statistics. This is a good book, and well worth the read, entertaining and enlightening.

Off The  Cliff:  Easy to fall for.